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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)
continue the discussion on climate science now with james hanson, head of the nasa institute for space studies and author of "storms of my grandchildren." he was awarded an award named for the scientist who advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment.
, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to bring our values and to it.
science-fiction but increasingly science fact and with good reason. japanese society is ageing faster than any in the world. over 3 million people suffer from senile dementia. nursing staff and facilities are stretched past capacity. against this backdrop researchers are building new and intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this old people's home in yokohama city, south of tokyo. the residents move their bodies on cue from a robot. the exercise helps the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they are recognized as medical equipment. ironically, care-giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only by humans, but the situation may be chan
. >>> japanese robots that look after the elderly, it sounds like science fiction but it's increasingly science fact and with good reason. japanese society is aging faster than any in the world. nursing facilities are stretched past capacity. against this backdrop, researchers are building new and humane intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this hold people's home south of tokyo. ♪ >> reporter: the residents move their bodies on cue from a robot. the exercise helps the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they recognize the medical equipment. ironically, care giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only by humans. but the situation may
, to have an endangerment finding, you have to have it based on science. what science would you use? she said, we would use the united nations, the inter governmental panel on climate change. it cooperate have been better -- it couldn't have been better timing. you talk about poetic justice, governor, it was a matter of days that clay mat gate came in. remember climate gate? it shows without a shadow of the doubt that the united nations has been cooking this science for a long period of time. >> it is amazing. when you bring these things to light a lot of americans are shocked to realize that you and the last few in the senate may be the last backstop before this administration takes us into some international treaty, international law, international agreement that none of us really would ever agree to. >> there are people i serve with who think it is not a good idea. what about our sovereignty? that's what it is all about. nonetheless, this did come from them. you have to keep in mind that -- you and i can both remember when the democrats' primary source of funding in washington was the
anderson, the creator of thunderbirds has died. >> 3, 2, 1. >> science fiction series first aired in 1965 with a use of the country. that followed the avengers of the international rescue using spacecraft and a range of vehicles. he suffered from alzheimer's disease since 2010. he died in his sleep at age 83. two bear cubs have been given a second chance after they were rescued by forest rangers. >> their mother was apparently killed, which means they were killed, which means they were all
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
piece looking at the world will be like in 150 years in the role of science and technology will play in our future. thanks so much for being with us from new york city today. guest: thanks for having me. happy new year. host: why look into the future? guest: you know, the world as we know, the world did not end on december 21st. so, i think this is really good time to look -- we've been all sort of focused on that date, not all of us, some of us. this is a good time to look into the future. we have a very popular department that we do every month called 50 and 100 and 150 years ago. this is where we go back into the archives of scientific american and we pick out things that people were writing and a lot of things people were writing were predictions about what the future would bring. we thought that we would turn it on its head and actually just do a whole package of articles in our january issue which is out on newsstands now. it looks at what could happen scientifically, technologically in the next 50, 100 and 150 years. host: you look at things like drone. also nuclear issues
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the sena
colonialism, ending cartels, spreading the fruits of science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist because he was the leading spokesperson for black civil rights, and a leads spokesperson for women's rights and the conservatives said america's fascistses are those that thing wall street comes first and the american people come second. so he had enemies and the enemies wantedded to get rid of him. but he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in california, gallup released a poll asking voters who they want on the ticket. 65% said they wanted wallace, 2% said they wanted harry truman the question how were the party bosses going to -- roosevelt was feeble and when they party bosses come to him and want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says i want wallace but i can't fight this by myself. i i'm not strong enough, and he finally gave in, and it was table that he did. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with him. every one of the roosevelt kids was furious. they were huge w
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. and you wouldn't have it any other way.e. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives, swelling of the
with a computer science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelor's in 2009 and my first job was actually at a retail store at the mall. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. so i figured i would go to law school to change to be where i want to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. he is still in college and worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> they settle with retail businesses. even all my friends work at mcdonald's and places like that because of the higher jobs that are hard to get these days. >> reporter: with the low- paying jobs, it will be that much harder. with tuitions rising across the nation, those bills are stacking up. >> one of my friends bar tend and work at the restaurant just to pay off the loan that she got. >> reporter: she has a 4-year- old as she is worried about what kind of a world her daughter will face. >> it is really disstressing. i got out of the school in the early 90s. it's a tough market. >> reporter: with all these colleg
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. real people with our new 15 under $15 menu. oh my goodness... oh my gosh, this looks amazing... [ male announcer ] 15 entrees under $15. it's our new maine stays! like chicken with wine sauce or bacon wrapped shrimp. try 15 under $15 and sea food differently. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ a delicious new way to get essential vitamins you need. just bite into the tasty shell... to a chewy vitamin core for a unique multivitamin sensation! new centrum flavor burst. >>> "nightline" continues from new york city with terry moran. >> in the age of google and siri, chances are you can't remember your boss's phone number. or maybe the capital of anywhere. but there are some people who make it their business to remember absolutely everything without the help of technolog
science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelors in 2009 and my first job was at a retail store. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. i figured i have to go to law school to get where i wanted to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. bill song is still. >> college and he's worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> all my friends have a hard time. all of my friends with high degrees working at mcdonalds or some places like that, the higher jobs are harder to get nowadays. >> reporter: with a low paying job it's harder for the college grads to pay back student loans. those bills are stacking up. >> one my friends bar tends and works at a restaurant just trying to pay off the lobes she got. >> reporter: maria has a 4-year- old and she's worried about what kind of world her daughter will face. >> it's really distressing. i got out of school in the early 90s. it was a tough market then, but not the way it is now. >> reporter: with all these college graduates in r
's. he and his wife sylvia began program making in the 1950's. it was when he combined science- fiction with puppetry that he achieved his most famous creations. the pilot was commissioned for 321 our programs. -- 32 one hour programs. >> he said it was not day television series. and then he walked all the way up to me and said, this is a feature film. >> stingray was the first-ever british children's series to be filmed in color. >> anything can happen in the next half hour. >> capt. scarlet featured more realistic puppets and darker situations. this was the last of his series to be made with his puppet the technique. >> 20 kilometers away. >> one character remains closest to his heart. >> my favorite character was parker. >> he will be remembered as a man who entertained adults and children, using mechanical puppets, which still produce stories filled with emotion and excitement. >> matt zimmerman was the voice of allen tracy, the blond one. he played him, he did the voice. we spoke to him earlier and he told me more about his relationship with jerry anderson. >> he was an amazing man
.s. government is calling in the national academy of sciences for yet another safety review of airport scanners. the department of homeland security says the nonprofit group of scientists will be charged with reviewing previous studies done on the scanners. the call comes amid continuing concerns from some members of congress, as well as some scientists, about the amount of radiation that the scanners subject travelers to. brave investors who bought junk-rated greek bonds in january of 2012 are sitting on profits. the highly-risky bond buy during an extremely volatile time for the country has earned investors 20 times more than people who purchased top-rated german debt this year. bloomberg news reports the return on the greek junk bonds is up 80%, compared to a gain of just 3.7% for german bonds. it helped that greece's credit rating was upgraded to b- in june from "selective default" when the greek soveriegn debt was restructed. making those new year's resolutions to live healthier affects your waistline and your wallet. bankrate.com has listed some of those popular resolutions and crunched
in the economic zone. the japan agency for marine, earth, and science technology will send a ship to an island about 2,000 kilometers southeast of tokyo. the ocean there is more than 5,000 meters deep. the researchers plan to extract samples of mud by sinking a pipe 20 meters into the seabed. then they'll analyze the types, densities, and locations of rare earth metals. a group from the university of tokyo found high concentrations of the metals in the area last june. they estimated the deposits could satisfy japan's needs for those materials for more than 200 years. analysts at the u.s. geological survey says china accounts for 97% of global output of the metals. >>> fresh or frozen? many gourmets say that's what separates a fine dining experience from a soggy tv meal. now a small japanese company is ready to send the question itself the way of the ice age. >> reporter: this high-end sushi restaurant in tokyo serves extremely good tuna. it's frozen, but you'd never guess. these are the advanced freezers which preserve the fish's freshness. the secret is magnetic waves. food is kept constantly
earth science and technology will send a ship to an area near an island about 2,000 kilometers southeast of tokyo. the ocean there is more than 5,000 meters deep. the researchers plan to extract samples of mud by sinking a pipe 20 meters into the seabed, then they will analyze the types, densities and locations of rare earth metals. a group from the university of tokyo found high concentrations of metals in the area last june. they estimated the deposit could satisfy japan's needs for those materials for more than 200 years. analysts at the u.s. geological survey say china currently accounts for 97% of global output of the metals. >>> fresh or frozen? gourmets say that's what separates fine dining experience from a soggy tv meal. now, a small japanese company is ready to send the question itself the way of the ice age. >> reporter: this high-end sushi restaurant in tokyo serves extremely good tuna. it's frozen, but you'd never guess. these are the advanced freezers which preserve the fish's freshness. the secret is magnetic wave he is. food is kept constantly vibrating so that ice crysta
happen at a nuclear plant. but experts say there isn't enough solid science in a draft outline, so they say they will need more time to finish their plans. >>> the nra decided to base the new guidelines on actual radiation readings. after the fukushima accident, authorities failed to get residents to evacuate promptly even though they had information from a radiation forecast system. the nra secretary is proposing the immediate evacuation of residents within 5 to 30 kilometers of a radiation plant when they reach 500 millisieverts per hour. they call for evacuation within a week's time if the level is at 20 millisieverts or more. but the panel of experts did not reach a consensus. some said the authority had simply decided on a level half that of international standard without enough scientific basis. others said the nra should adopt the international standard for the time being and continue discussions to set japan's own standards. >>> the operator of the crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear plant is asking for more public money. they say the compensation payments are higher than th
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
the epa. inhof of the science committee issued a report back in october where he said the obama administration not just the epa but several agencies are working to find way to regulate the hydraulic fracturing at the federal level to stop the practice altogether. irony is fracking is one thing in the environmental -- excuse me, manufacturing sector that lifted up the economy. to the point it's not talked about exporting liquid natural gas. >> hypocrisy of the idealogue on the left. in the past coal was a big offender. they wanted to kill coal, which the epa has done. natural gas is wond evidenceful because it emit that was carbon. now coal is abolished we don't have new plans and now they are going after the natural gas. supposed to be benign. if you say it's a pendulum, it's not. ratchet. it expands. republicans can shrink it in the future you be in the end, it's inforrable and it grows. >> thank you. stay tuned for president's >>
coulter, it will smash your house. this is about internalizing science and making the science become part of the cultural vocabulary. the problem with the right-wing agenda with this huge cloud of disinformation is people are very naive and the arts can help and catalyze an emotional discussion. the numbers are speaking. we have had record level drought, we have record-level firestorms, and storms. colorado, texas, the list goes on of places that have been hammered. you have to be foolish, someone like george bush to not process that. you have -- it is incredible. you still have to point out, your house is on fire. you are like, really? that is my take on it as a downtown dj. >> the last question on the left. >> thank you. part of what you said about the gift giving economy. an anthropologist wrote a book on the gift economy and wrote another book on "the ethnography of direct action" which touched on things that happened with occupy. with social movement, the eupepsia -- maybe you can speak to a -- going toward reaction and fizzling out? or you see this accelerating, moving from a creati
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> an update from south africa tonight on nelson mandela. the 94-year-old former president was released from a hospital after almost three weeks of being treated for a lung infection and surgery to remove gallstones. mandela was moved to his home in johannesburg where he will continue his recovery. >>> china opened the world's longest high-speed rail line today. the train travels more than 1,400 miles from beijing in the north to the south of china, a trip that until now took 20 hours. the new train traveling at 186 miles per hour cuts the time to just eight hours. hundreds of the new trains will be put into service on this line alone, as china moves toward its goal of building a nationwide high-speed rail network. >>> and back in this country, a lost and found story involving a best friend. it all began christmas eve outside a grocery store here in new york where a security camera shows a man stealing a dog and then walking away. that dog's name is marlee. a woman who saw him trying to sell the d
quickly. >> the process of threat assessment is, is more of an art than a science. oftentimes you're dealing, uh, with potential enemies whose thinking is obscure or whose inner thoughts are unavailable to you and you have to read the tea leaves in trying to divine what their actions might be. >> people want to make a choice, they want to say let's focus on the current problem, less on the future. so other people say let's focus on the future and not so much on the current problem and unfortunately we don't have that option, that's just not with the role the united states plays today. >> ultimately defending the country with less money will mean rethinking what defense really is. >> the old-fashioned establishment of national security still thinks that the world is all about nation-state conflicts. so climate change doesn't rank high, energy scarcity doesn't rank high, resource generally, global health issues. even financial management after 2008 still ranks far below the sort of old-fashioned, you know, country-versus-country conflict issues. that's changing, but it's changing sl
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ dennis: -- >> looked worse earlier, the past hour or so, the dow just in the green, bank of america doing some heavy lifting today. it's the one dow stock hitting new highs. good afternoon, everybody, i'm ashley webster, the last hour ever trading, and the count down to the closing bell begins right now. as i said earlier on, appears the bulls had too much eggnog and christmas cheer thanks to the continued uncertainty of washington, no real progress on a debt deal. the house speaker stuck in a blizzard in ohio, but you know what? the dow managed to raise earlier, just up a hint now, just a touch. meanwhile, the nasdaq, the s&p500, and the russell, as you can see, down slightly on the day after christmas. retail stocks are casting a follow on the market, the s&p500, the high end end names, all in the red. we got coach, high end retailers such as tiffany moving lower, ralph lauren, urban jut fitters lower on poor data on sales this holiday season, and it's
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicious activity in their network. lifelock wants you to be protected this holiday season, so they're giving you 60 days of protection risk-free. >> my years as a prosecutor taugh
was at 5. their science is so much more superior to everybody else's when it comes to this macular degeneration, i think the stock -- buy buy buy, is going to 200. mike until nebraska? >> caller: happy new year, boo-yah, jim. >> same. >> caller: win -- >> no, i'm not convinced. i don't like these other companies that are, that started out as wireline companies to try to do more. it's not good enough. broadband, to me it's not working, you can stick with it but i don't like it. matt in new york? >> caller: boo-yah, thanks for taking my call, jim. >> what's going on? >> caller: i'm getting into stocks. i'm wondering what your opinion is on. >> which one? >> nike, nke? >> i think nike is terrific. i believe in the return in china, north america, doing terrifically. splits the stock, it's a $50 stock, i think it can go to $60. glen in virginia? >> caller: jim, i'm a long-time listener i want to thank you for helping me get back to even sometime ago. >> you're terrific for saying that, thank you so much. howky help? >> caller: i'm retired living on dividends, my favorite stock is triang
approach. i mean, it's not rocket science to see that we have a democratic senate, a republican house and a democratic president, and that's going to be the same starting january 3 of next year for at least two more years. so we know what we're dealing with, and i think it affects us right now in the fiscal cliff negotiations because we are not going to do anything unless it is bipartisan. we will not be able to pass anything in the house that doesn't have significant republican votes in the senate, and the democrats in the senate are not going to be able to support something that won't require some votes of democrats in the house. so we are together, maybe it's like a dysfunctional family, but we do have to work together because without bipartisanship, nothing is going anywhere. therefore, i think you have to go back to negotiations 101. which is that someone in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the other party in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the president is not going to get everything he wants. the republicans in the house and senate are not going to get
of science, 50, 100 and 150 years from now. thank you so much for being with us from new york city this morning. guest: it's my pleasure. host: we now go to the floor of house of representatives. that's all for "washington journal" this morning. the house is in for morning hour and at noon for legislative usiness. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. january 2, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable david rivera to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists smithed by the majority and minority leaders -- submitted by majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and minority whip limited to five minutes e
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)